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Titling a Painting

Brittany Fields

Étiquettes abstract art, art gallery, Blog

Titling a painting is only hard if you allow it to be. I can buy a piece of art and rename it. When I paint I try to have an idea on the direction I want to go. An Exhibit B painting will usually remain untitled until it has a home. The work is more important than the title. If songs didn’t have names, we would love them just as much as we do now. If neighborhoods had no names, we would still know which ones we prefer living in. This is how I see it. 

I want collectors to invest my paintings because it’s a masterpiece. The point I’m trying to make is that the title doesn’t matter as much as one may think, only for record keeping purposes. Even if it's the month and year, that is better than nothing to see how your style has changed. For selling, the painting will either get notice by the artist or the quality of work.


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